Board of Public Works to Take Up Questions About Conflict of Interest

Despite appearing on the initial agenda, one of the more controversial items on the Evansville City Council docket Monday night was pulled at the last minute. The item concerned conflict of interest documentation for a grant-funded, income-based home that was built by the Memorial Community Development Corporation, the non-profit arm of Memorial Baptist Church.

During a recent yearly audit, city officials was discovered that the son of Rev. Adrian Brooks, the president of Memorial CDC was living in a home on Washington Avenue. The home was built using federal grant money that Memorial CDC received from the city. Because of this, the non-profit organization is subject to routine, yearly audits by the city.

City officials said Brooks' son, Anthony, was income-qualified to live at the home. However, because of his familial relationship to the developer it triggered a series of forms that must be signed and approved by various local and federal officials.

The item that was to go before the City Council on Monday night concerned the proper documentation that would notify the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) of the potential conflict of interest. These forms must be approved by a public body like the City Council before the documentation is forwarded to HUD, officials said.

Rev. Brooks said during a press conference early Monday morning that the letter of the law was followed and Memorial CDC's actions were more than above board.

"Before my son lived there or it was ever built, we had pre-qualified and filled out all the forms required by HUD, including the conflict of interest forms," Rev. Brooks said. 

The request for approval of this documentation was on the city council's agenda up until hours before the meeting, said Council President Missy Mosby. However, the item was withdrawn by the Mayor's Office. Deputy Mayor Steve Schaefer tells Eyewitness News that the item will instead go before the Board of Public Works. Historically, BPW has approved prior conflict of interest forms. 

"Honestly, it doesn't matter what public body approves it. It just has to be approved by a public body at a public meeting. That's what HUD stipulates," said Kelley Coures, the executive director of the Department of Metropolitan Development.

In the end, HUD officials will have the final say on whether Brooks' son can live at the home because it was constructed using federal grant dollars.

 

More Stories

Don't Miss

  • Home For The Holidays Page
    Copyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
  • Tristate Professionals
    Copyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
  • Pro Football Challenge
    Copyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
  • Dr. Oz Wellness Network
    Copyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
  • Community Calendar
    Copyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Trending Stories

Video Center