Red Cross: Hurricane Harvey Update

The American Red Cross has released an update with the latest information on their response to Hurricane Harvey.

Here's the full release:

One week after Hurricane Harvey made landfall, the American Red Cross is working non-stop to help people impacted by what is being called the worst flooding disaster in U.S. history. Our hearts go out to everyone affected.

Harvey’s remnants are forecast to produce as much as 10 inches of rain across western Tennessee and Kentucky. Rivers and bayous in southeast Texas, particularly in the Beaumont and Port Arthur regions, will likely remain in major to record flooding stage through next week.

Evacuation orders are in still in effect for hundreds of thousands of people, including the entire city of Beaumont, Texas. Transportation, travel and housing are expected to be impacted for an extended period of time. Schools are closed, and hundreds of thousands of residents remain without power. Communications outages are widespread, and multiple water treatment plants are shut down in Texas and Louisiana. Several oil refineries and chemical plants are also closed.

Meanwhile, Hurricane Irma in the Atlantic is predicted to be a major hurricane, The Red Cross is watching the storm and preparing to respond if necessary.

The danger isn’t over. As catastrophic flooding continues, access into many areas is still quite difficult, and we are partnering with the U.S. Coast Guard and the Texas National Guard to move supplies and volunteers. Our first priority is keeping people safe while providing shelter, food and a shoulder to lean on.

President and CEO Gail McGovern Video on Red Cross Response

Red Cross Response

Right now, thanks to the support of donors, the Red Cross is continues to provide aid and relief to areas devastated by Harvey. This includes:

·More than 42,000 people staying in 258 Red Cross and community shelters across Texas overnight. In Louisiana, more than 1,500 people spent the night in 6 Red Cross and community shelters, and a handful of people spent the night in evacuation shelters in Tennessee.
·More than 2,300 disaster workers are on the ground, and more than 700 are on the way. They are being joined by a group of highly-skilled volunteers from the Mexican Red Cross who will help support shelters, distribute aid and connect with Spanish speaking disaster survivors to keep them informed about support available to them.
·Shelter supplies for more than 75,000 people are in Texas, with supplies for an additional 10,000 on the way.
·Along with our partners, we have served more than 392,000 meals and snacks since the storm began. 
·We have trailers of kitchen supplies on the ground to support 10 kitchens, each able to produce 10,000 meals a day, and 6 more trailers are on the way. We also have about 135,000 ready-to-eat meals currently on the ground with an additional 20,000 en route.
·More than 200 Emergency Response Vehicles have been activated for the operation.
·Mental health and health services professionals have provided some 8,000 contacts to provide support and care to evacuees.
·We’ve distributed more than 26,000 relief items like diapers and comfort kits that contain deodorant, toothbrushes, toothpaste and other hygiene items for people forced from their homes.
·The Red Cross continues to deliver blood and platelets to our hospital partners in flood affected areas. Working closely with local, state and federal authorities, the Red Cross has airlifted more than 500 blood products to Houston hospitals over the past week.
·More than 20 million hurricane and flood alerts have been issued through Red Cross mobile apps since August 23.The apps provide shelter locations and real-time information so people can help protect themselves and their loved-ones.

(This story was originally published on September 1, 2017)


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