Facing Third Bout with Leukemia, Detective Calls Upon the Community

He has defeated leukemia twice but to beat it three times, it might take a perfect match. To find that match, a stem cell donor drive will be held in honor of Evansville Police Detective Nathan Schroer.

He has defeated leukemia twice but to beat it three times, it might take a perfect match. To find that match, a stem cell donor drive will be held in honor of Evansville Police Detective Nathan Schroer.

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Everyone has a title.

Veteran detective, devoted father and steadfast fighter are just some of the titles Nathan Schroer keeps.

“There's about an hour that happens when you hear that news,” said Schroer. “It's disappointing."

The news is disappointing but not overwhelmingly discouraging, Schroer says, even after hearing that news again and again and again.

“I know way more about chemotherapy than the average person," said Schroer.

Doctors first diagnosed Schroer with leukemia nine years ago. He beat the blood cancer after receiving a bone marrow donation that came from a brother Schroer never knew he had.

Schroer and his wife Lindsay then adopted a son after doctors told them they would never be able to have kids of their own. A few years later, Lindsay gave birth to not one child but two.

In February this year, Doctors told Schroer that his leukemia had returned only to have to have go into remission.

But in September, Schroer’s doctors said the leukemia had returned, as if two tests of faith were not enough.

“Getting leukemia three times is usually not very good,” said Schroer. “But again, there are a lot of wise doctors. There are a lot of wise researchers and wise pharmacists. But they do not have the final say in life or death. I listen to them but I trust in God."

Schroer, a man so deeply rooted in family and faith, is back in his corner office at Holly’s House, working for EPD’s Special Victims Unit. Schroer canvasses over case files, hoping and praying his latest round of chemotherapy works.

If not, his treatment will turn to stem cells and the perfect match that could donate those stem cells. A donor drive scheduled next month could help bring the two together.

“The more people that are in the registry, the more there is a chance that I might find a match,” said Schroer. “And if there are more people in the registry means they might be a match for someone else."

Schroer is a father, a fighter and a survivor. But above all else, Schroer says, he is a believer.

“My greatest need is not to be healed from leukemia,” said Schroer. “My greatest need is to be forgiven by a Holy God for my sins. God has done that.”

“Yes, I want to be there for my daughters and my son. I want to be there for my wife. I don't like the thought of my kids asking where I am. But it says in scripture that I’m confident these present sufferings will be nothing compared to the glory revealed in us. I’m good with that. I believe that."

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The stem cell donor drive in honor of Det. Schroer will be held on Sunday, November 3rd. It will be held at both the Evansville and Newburgh locations of Northwoods Church. The Evansville location is located at 9920 N. Green River Road and the Newburgh location can be found at 8122 Robin Hill Road inside the old Newburgh Cinema.

The donor drive lasts from noon until four. To qualify, you must be between 18 to 55 years old and have a relatively clean bill of health. It's free and takes no more than 5 minutes to register.

More information on donor requirements can be found by visiting http://www.deletebloodcancer.org/

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