Tests Still Not Showing Signs of Diluted Chemical

The peak of the plume has made it's way down the Ohio River and there's still no detectable amounts found of the MCHM chemical. Just to be safe, Evansville's Water and Sewer Utility has been testing samples every hour and will continue to treat the water with activated carbon through tomorrow.

The peak of the plume has made it's way down the Ohio River and there's still no detectable amounts found of the MCHM chemical. Just to be safe, Evansville's Water and Sewer Utility has been testing samples every hour and will continue to treat the water with activated carbon through tomorrow.

Officials in Henderson and in Evansville say each test on Ohio River water continues to show no measurable amount of the chemical that made its way down from West Virginia.

"It's been below our testable limits for our equipment which is the same equipment that Louisville has and Cincinnati has. It's not showing up there either," said Allen Mounts, the director of the Evansville Water and Sewer Utility. "Another characteristic about this particular chemical is that emits a very sweet, licorice smell and we've not been able to detect that.
 
A graph provided by officials shows the amounts of the chemical at different testing sites along the Ohio River. Traces of the chemical peaked in West Virginia where the spill occurred. It has continued to dilute since then and barely even registered at the testing site in Louisville. Even still, officials will keep testing and treating.

"It put a lot of stress on our lab team to gear up for this as well as the treatment plant because it requires extra treatment processes," Mounts aid. "They've been working around the clock, non stop. Our lab manager, for example, has a cot in his room. He's been there 24/7.

The hourly tests will continue through Tuesday. The water is perfectly safe to drink, Mounts said.
The peak of the plume has made it's way down the Ohio River and there's still no detectable amounts found of the MCHM chemical. Just to be safe, Evansville's Water and Sewer Utility has been testing samples every hour and will continue to treat the water with activated carbon through tomorrow.

Officials in Henderson and in Evansville say each test on Ohio River water continues to show no measurable amount of the chemical that made its way down from West Virginia.

"It's been below our testable limits for our equipment which is the same equipment that Louisville has and Cincinnati has. It's not showing up there either," said Allen Mounts, the director of the Evansville Water and Sewer Utility. "Another characteristic about this particular chemical is that emits a very sweet, licorice smell and we've not been able to detect that.
 
A graph provided by officials shows the amounts of the chemical at different testing sites along the Ohio River. Traces of the chemical peaked in West Virginia where the spill occured. It has continued to dilute since then and barely even registered at the testing site in Louisville. Even still, officials will keep testing and treating.

"It put a lot of stress on our lab team to gear up for this as well as the treatment plant because it requires extra treatment processes," Mounts aid. "They've been working around the clock, non stop. Our lab manager, for example, has a cot in his room. He's been there 24/7.

The hourly tests will continue through Tuesday. The water is perfectly safe to drink, Mounts said.
The peak of the plume has made it's way down the Ohio River and there's still no detectable amounts found of the MCHM chemical. Just to be safe, Evansville's Water and Sewer Utility has been testing samples every hour and will continue to treat the water with activated carbon through tomorrow.

Officials in Henderson and in Evansville say each test on Ohio River water continues to show no measurable amount of the chemical that made its way down from West Virginia.

"It's been below our testable limits for our equipment which is the same equipment that Louisville has and Cincinnati has. It's not showing up there either," said Allen Mounts, the director of the Evansville Water and Sewer Utility. "Another characteristic about this particular chemical is that emits a very sweet, licorice smell and we've not been able to detect that.

Because the highest concentration of the chemical has already passed, Mounts said if it hasn't been detected yet, it likely never will.
 
A graph provided by officials shows the amounts of the chemical at different testing sites along the Ohio River. Traces of the chemical peaked in West Virginia where the spill occurred. It has continued to dilute since then and barely even registered at the testing site in Louisville. Even still, officials will keep testing and treating.

"It put a lot of stress on our lab team to gear up for this as well as the treatment plant because it requires extra treatment processes," Mounts aid. "They've been working around the clock, non stop. Our lab manager, for example, has a cot in his room. He's been there 24/7.

The hourly tests will continue through Tuesday. The water is perfectly safe to drink, Mounts said.

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