Extreme cold crosses Midwest, Scientists push back against climate change doubts

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It’s freezing in many parts of the country, but does the frigid cold weather argue against the science of climate change?

President Trump weighed in via Twitter.

NOAA scientists say there’s a difference between temperatures and climate change.

Parts of the US are getting slammed with severe winter weather, with wind chills reaching negative 30 or below, leading to some skepticism about climate change.

Earlier this week President Trump said in a tweet “what the hell is going on with global warming? Please come back fast. We need you.”

Kenneth Kunkel, a climate change expert at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and a research professor at North Carolina State University says single weather events are different than overall climate trends.

“In order to determine whether or not climate is changing as a whole – we do need to look over longer periods of time.”

Kunkel found changes in weather patterns over the past century.

“The last couple of decades we have experienced fewer and less intense cold waves than before that.”

Scientists say weather events like droughts and hurricanes are getting worse and more severe because of climate change.

And communities all around the country are dealing with the effects.

“If you look at the flooding or you look at the crazy rain storms or you look at the forest fires…”

The Mayor of Salt Lake City, Utah was in Washington DC recently leading a panel on climate change.

“What we need to do is help communities and members of our communities come to the table and be a part of the solution.”

She says climate change is undeniable and hopes everyone will work to reverse the effects rather than deny it.

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(This story was originally published on February 1, 2019)

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